Nook Simple Touch With Glowlight Gets Uk Price Cut, Drops Below £50

UK Detention of Reprieve Activist Consistent with NSA’s View of Drone Opponents as ‘Threats’ and ‘Adversaries’

After all, you can get one for 49 now that Barnes & Noble has slashed 20 off its retail price — that’s far, far lower than the amount people had to pay at launch. According to the book retailer, you can only snag the device at that price point until current stocks last, so the promo can expire anytime. If you’re not particularly fond of e-readers, though, feel free to cast your eyes upon the discounted Nook HD and HD+ tablets instead. You can also nab one of those right now, or, you know, throw hints at your personal Santa that you want one for Christmas. Show full PR text Top-Rated NOOK Simple Touch(R) GlowLight(R) Now an Amazing Value at 49 First Under-50 eReader with GlowLight Technology Makes the Perfect Present LONDON, Sep 24, 2013 (BUSINESS WIRE) — NOOK Media LLC, a subsidiary of Barnes & Noble, Inc. BKS +1.59% , the world’s largest bookseller and leading retailer of content, digital media and educational products, is making the critically acclaimed NOOK Simple Touch GlowLight available for just 49, while stocks last, making it the only eReader with integrated lighting in the UK under 50. It will be available at this amazing new price starting today at leading retailers across the UK, ready for Christmas. “No other eReader in the UK anywhere near this price has an integrated light, sits comfortably and lightly in the hand and has a battery that will last up to two months,” said Jim Hilt, Managing Director, Barnes & Noble S.a.r.l. “It’s an unbeatable value for one of our best-loved and most highly acclaimed products, making now the perfect time to choose an eReader for yourself or for your favourite reader as an early Christmas present.” NOOK Simple Touch GlowLight is the ideal reading companion for beach or late-night reading. Barnes & Noble’s innovative lighting technology shines uniformly across the display and adjusts with just a touch, so customers can control the amount of light, whether in a dimly lit or pitch dark room. NOOK Simple Touch GlowLight, as well as the critically acclaimed NOOK(R) HD and NOOK(R) HD+ tablets, are available at major UK retailers including Argos, ASDA, Blackwell’s, Foyles, Currys and PC World, John Lewis, Sainsbury’s and Very, both in stores and online. NOOK now has the most affordable line of eReaders and tablets in the UK. Customers can purchase the 7-inch NOOK HD for just 79 (8GB) and 99 (16GB), while the 9-inch NOOK HD+ tablet is available for just 129 (16GB) and 149 (32GB). For more information visit NOOK.co.uk. Additional NOOK Simple Touch GlowLight Features: — Shop 2.5 Million Books and More: NOOK wirelessly connects via Wi-Fi to the NOOK Store(R) (NOOK.co.uk), one of the world’s largest digital bookstores with more than 2.5 million digital books, including more than 1 million free titles.

UK retailers remove ‘staggeringly offensive’ mental health costumes from sale

STORY HIGHLIGHTS Walmart subsidiary Asda and retailer Tesco were selling mental health themed costumes The British retailers apologized and withdrew them from sale after a social media outcry Mental health charity Mind said the sale of the costumes had been “extremely misguided” Soccer player Stan Collymore tweeted about the effect of mental health stereotypes (CNN) — British retailers have removed “psycho ward” and “mental patient” Halloween costumes from their online stores after criticism that they were offensive to people with mental health conditions. Walmart subsidiary Asda showed a man in a blood-stained white coat brandishing a meat cleaver to advertise its “Mental Patient Fancy Dress Costume.” Tesco’s advertisement for its “Psycho Ward Costume” showed a man in an orange boiler suit branded “PSYCHO WARD” brandishing a hypodermic needle and wearing a mask similar to that of Hannibal Lecter in the film, “The Silence of the Lambs.” An Asda spokeswoman offered the company’s “sincere apologies for the offense” the costumes had caused. “This was an unacceptable error and the product was withdrawn immediately,” she said in a statement. “We take our responsibilities very seriously which is why we will make a sizable donation to Mind.” Tesco also issued an apology, saying in a statement: “We’re really sorry for any offense this has caused and we are removing this product from sale.” Mental health charity Mind welcomed the withdrawal of the costumes, saying the retailers had shown themselves to be “extremely misguided” by offering them for sale. Slept in. Have @asda withdrawn their ‘mental patient fancy dress’ costume or are we going to organise a protest at HQ? #timetochange Alastair Campbell (@campbellclaret) September 26, 2013 Alastair Campbell “It is staggeringly offensive to the one in four of us affected by mental health problems and our families and friends, and troubling that some businesses are still so out of touch with the public mood,” spokeswoman Sue Baker said in a statement . However, Baker said the outcry the costumes provoked on the social media site Twitter was encouraging. “We hope this will urge Asda, Tesco and other retailers and manufacturers to review their processes and consider taste and decency on mental health grounds, to avoid fueling stigma and discrimination that are so damaging for large numbers of the population,” she said. Mind and the group Rethink Mental Illness run the Time to Change campaign to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination. One of the campaign’s supporters is Alastair Campbell, who was former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair’s media chief and who has publicly spoken of his battle with depression . Campbell was among those who tweeted his displeasure at the “brutally stigmatizing outfits.” “@asda and @tesco should sign up for one of the @mindcharity @Rethink_ @TimetoChange mental health training courses,” he tweeted . Campbell alleged that Amazon still carried mental health patient costumes and called for people to tweet the company, asking it to withdraw them. But in response to an inquiry from CNN, an Amazon spokesperson said: “The item you refer to is not available on Amazon.co.uk.” Soccer player and broadcaster Stan Collymore who has also spoken out on depression, also took to Twitter to criticize the stereotype he said Asda and Tesco’s costumes had promoted.

DNP Nook price cut

When he objected that his political views had no relevance to security concerns, UK law enforcement officials threatened to detain him for the full nine hours allowed by the Terrorism Act of 2000, the same statute that was abused by UK officials last month to detain my partner, David Miranda , for nine hours. Shiban tells his story today, here , in the Guardian, and recounts how the UK official told him “he had detained me not merely because I was from Yemen, but also because of Reprieve’s work investigating and criticising the efficacy of US drone strikes in my country.” The notion that Shiban posed some sort of security threat was absurd on its face. As the Guardian reported Tuesday, “he visited the UK without incident earlier this summer and testified in May to a US congressional hearing on the impact of the covert drone programme in Yemen.” Viewing anti-drone activism as indicative of a terrorism threat is noxious. As Reprieve’s Cory Crider put it yesterday, “if there were any doubt the UK was abusing its counter-terrorism powers to silence critics, this ends it.” But perceiving drone opponents as “threats” or even “adversaries” is hardly new. Top secret US government documents obtained by the Guardian from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden characterize even the most basic political and legal opposition to drone attacks as part of “propaganda campaigns” from America’s “adversaries”. The entry is part of a top secret internal US government website, similar in appearance to the online Wikipedia site. According to a June interview with Snowden in Hong Kong, the only individuals empowered to write these entries are those “with top secret clearance and public key infrastructure certificates”, special access cards enabling unique access to certain parts of NSA systems. He added that the entries are “peer reviewed” and that every edit made is recorded by user. One specific entry discusses “threats to unmanned aerial vehicles”. It lists various dangers to American drones , including “air defense threats”, “jamming of UAV sensor systems”, “terrestrial weather”, and “electronic warfare employed against the command and control system”. But alongside those more obvious, conventional threats are what the entry describes as “propaganda campaigns that target UAV use”. Under the title “adversary propaganda themes”, the document lists what it calls “examples of potential propaganda themes that could be employed against UAV operations”.