Is California Going Too Far To Protect Celebrity Kids From Paparazzi?

The widespread public speculation on whether the case was settled by manipulation from the privileged or pressure from the public may not end so easily. On Thursday morning, journalists gathered in front of the Beijing Haidian District People’s Court, swarming defendants and lawyers and indeed anyone who might offer them an exclusive morsel of news. By 6 p.m. Thursday, about eight hours after the verdict, the name of the younger Li was the most searched phrase in weibo.com, China’s most popular microblogging website, with more than 10 million users posting and reposting opinions or news about him. PRIVILEGE SUSPECTED Five men were detained on Feb. 21 after a woman reported to police that she had been taken to a hotel and gang raped after drinking with the men in a bar on Feb. 17. The case has stayed in the limelight since the already-notorious son of the dean of music at the People’s Liberation Army Academy of Arts was one of the suspects. Li senior, 74, built his reputation in past decades with popular patriotic songs and has been widely criticized by internet users for failing to raise his son properly. During the trial and pretrial in July and August, lawyers squabbled furiously on whether the crime was rape or prostitution. Li junior denied rape: The other four, less celebrated defendants, pled guilty.

Comedian PUNCHES reporter who tweet-heckled him during ‘Funniest Celebrity in Washington’ contest

‘Not a joke.’ Rogin was overheard afterward saying that Nainan had approached him in the back of the comedy club and punched him. CNN anchor Candy Crowley, known for moderating the second presidential debate in 2012, threw out the ‘ceremonial first joke’ — a barb about womanizing aimed at former President Bill Clinton ‘Dan Nainan comes over to me and says, “Are you Josh Rogin?” and I said yes,’ he said in comments first reported by U.S. News & World Report . ‘And then he punched me in the jaw, then he pushed me, then he walked away and about 10 seconds later he came over and punched me again.’ ‘My face hurts’: Rogin called the police after the comedian sucker-punched him. Several witnesses saw the episode unfold in real time ‘At that point I yelled, “What the hell are you doing?” Rogin continued. ‘Other people noticed and they courted him off, and the bouncers escorted him from the show room, and we called the police and hes in the process of being arrested.’ Siegel said he was disappointed with Nainan’s snap after what he called a ‘great’ performance on stage. ‘We as comedians by the very nature of the business have thick skin,’ he said. ‘So what if a reporter doesn’t like your act?’ ‘If you do well in comedy you know it right there on the spot. I don’t know why he got so angry.’ Rogin told The Washington Post that the attack took him by surprise. ‘I didnt think I was being too harsh with him hes a professional comedian and I was being a professional journalist,’ he said, before adding: ‘My face hurts.’ ‘One or two sucker punches can’t stop the truth from getting out,’ he told Politico on Thursday. ‘Dan Nainan is just not that funny.’ Nainan is among the modern stand-up comics who are closely tuned in to social media. He told The New York Times in 2012 that he had purchased 220,000 Twitter followers from a black-market company in order to boost his online credibility.

The Motion Picture Association of America and the California Newspaper Publishers Association have joined legal analysts and reporters concerned that the law may be overly broad and interfere with legitimate news gathering and other legal activities. I expect this law to be challenged the first time prosecutors take a photographer to court, says Lou Virelli, a constitutional law professor at Stetson University in central Florida. RECOMMENDED: How much do you know about California? Take our quiz. The law targets any person who intentionally harasses the child or ward of any other person because of that persons employment. It further specifies that harassment means knowing and willful conduct directed at a specific child that seriously alarms, annoys, torments, or terrorizes the child and that serves no legitimate purpose and that includes recording an image or voice. These provisions worry education reporter Andrea Johnson, who writes for the Minot Daily News in North Dakota. She often covers childrens issues and notes that there are already many privacy protections in place for most children. It is very easy for parents to get riled up over privacy concerns when a new law passes. I am concerned that this might spread to other states, fanned by parents who have growing concerns over the privacy rights of their own children, she says. Its hard enough to do our jobs without having new restrictions such as the requirement to get written permission from parents for legitimate interviews with their children, Ms. Johnson adds. Legal challenges to the statute are likely, says Laurie Levenson, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. Reporters and paparazzi will claim it infringes on their First Amendment rights, she says via e-mail.